The View from The Niagara Guide

General observations and musings on how we can make Niagara a better place.

Slow Progress is Still Progress

Mark Kawabe - Thursday, October 20, 2016

Remember - the tortoise won the race.

Whenever I drive, I'm passed by a faster driver. That's okay. For me, the purpose of driving is to get from point A to point B in a safe, relaxed and enjoyable style.

Perhaps those faster drivers are going to arrive at their destinations before I do. That's fine. I don't care. As long as I get where I'm going, that's what counts.

I take the same approach to a lot of things. It seems to work for me. Perhaps it could for you too. Let's look at a few areas where taking some time can be beneficial.

Eating

 Did you know eating slowly can help you lose weight? It takes approximately 20 minutes from the time you start eating for your brain to let your body know you're full. When you slow your eating pace, you will feel full sooner and will eat fewer calories. You will also digest your food better, potentially leading to less bloating, gas, and other gastrointestinal issues.

Saving Money

Anecdotal evidence suggests that many people don't have much in savings. It might seem hard to save, unless you commit to it and start slow. If you commit to putting aside an amount that works for you on a regular basis, you'll be ahead of the game in the long run. You're not going to get rich doing this, but at least you'll have money put aside in case of emergency.

The same applies when you're investing. You don't need to swing for the fences with every investment. Getting a solid rate of return over while protecting your investment is possible. Talk to a financial advisor and find out the possibilities for what you can afford.

Weight Loss

If you have 20 lbs to lose, losing it in a day would be horrible. Your body would have to go through a lot of painful adjustments. It probably wouldn't be pleasant, or worth it in the end. Losing weight gradually has been shown to be the healthiest approach.

Running a Business

If you run a business, you know it's not a get-rich-quick scheme. Success takes hard work and time. Patience and persistence and plenty of properly-applied elbow grease will get you where you want to go.

We're bombarded with messages that we can have it all, and we can have it now. Be grateful for what you have, and strive to improve yourself and your situation. Even if your progress is slow, it's still progress and it's better than not trying at all.



Thoughts About Getting Along

Mark Kawabe - Monday, October 17, 2016

Working together for the common good

I'm wondering if you're observing the same thing I am. Public discourse is continuing to deteriorate. Negativity, insults and anger are becoming more and more prevalent.

It's understandable, I think, because in general, people are angry and scared.

Angry because things aren't going their way. Angry because things are changing. Angry because things that don't matter to them matter a LOT to other people, and it doesn't make sense to them. And, scared because if the other people "get their way", there will be change from "the way things were".

Others are angry because they're on "the other side". They're the ones who've been oppressed and marginalized. Attitudes are shifting, acceptance is starting to come, but it's not coming fast enough because things that matter to them don't matter to a lot of other people, and it doesn't make sense to them. Scared because if the movement starts to fizzle, things will potentially go back to "the way things were".

Fear and anger are also combined with a societal trend towards individualism. Everyone has rights as an individual. While this is true, I think many of us have forgotten our responsibilities to ourselves and society.

We need each other in order to survive and thrive. Out of a population of 7 billion, the number of people who could survive on their own with no help from any other human is incredibly low. Do you run a business? You need customers. Do you eat? You need a farmer.

While we are interdependent, we are not well interconnected. We organize ourselves into communities based on religion, race, orientation, socio-economic status and more. In general, our communities don't mix, and as a result, our ability to understand each other is limited.

Don't understand the "black lives matter" movement? It's probably because you're not black, don't have black friends, don't live in areas where many black people live, and don't experience policing the way black people do.

Are you having trouble understanding why indigenous activists would prefer we not refer to Cleveland's baseball team by their name or show their logo in the media? I'll take a guess then that you're not indigenous, don't have any friends who are, and don't experience discrimination and negative cultural stereotypes the way indigenous people do.

Perhaps you're annoyed at our government. Fair enough. Most people are. The Liberal party happens to be in power in Ontario and Canada. You can disagree with their policies and approach, but insulting Liberal leaders and those who voted Liberal simply polarizes the discussion rather than leading to a productive solution. Building a society where we all work together means learning how to listen, empathize, and if we choose to disagree, to disagree with understanding. 

If we collectively all want to live in peace and harmony, we need to become more integrated into each other's communities. This is not an easy task. It can be uncomfortable. That discomfort gives us an excuse to avoid taking the steps needed to foster better understanding between people.

We have a right to be angry and scared, but we also have a responsibility to ourselves and to our children and to all those we are interdependent with to make this world a better place. Mutual respect, understanding and compassion are required to move our society forward. Improving our society means improving our discourse with each other.

It starts with me, and it starts with you.

 



Happy Canadian Thanksgiving

Mark Kawabe - Sunday, October 09, 2016

Happy Thanksgiving

A few things you may not know about the origins of Thanksgiving in Canada.

  • The first Thanksgiving celebration in North America is said to have taken place during Martin Frobisher's voyage in 1578. It was held in what is now Frobisher Bay, Nunavut. The event thought of as the first Thanksgiving in the United States took place in 1621.
  • Thanksgiving has its roots in European harvest festivals.
  • Turkey, pumpkin and squash were added to Canadian Thanskgiving practices by the United Empire Loyalists after the American Revolution.
  • Thanksgiving was originally celebrated in 1816 on May 21 in lower Canada and June 18 in upper Canada. Thanksgiving was declared a national holiday in 1879, although the date fluctuated. It wasn't until 1957 that Thanksgiving was decreed to be the second Monday in October.

Let us remember that for all the challenges we may face individually, within our families, our communities and society as a whole, as Canadians, we have much to be thankful for.

I hope you have a happy, healthy and joyous Thanksgiving weekend.



The Problem With Solutions

Mark Kawabe - Friday, October 07, 2016

SolutionsEvery day, we're faced with problems. Some are old. Some are new. Some of our own creation. Some we had nothing to do with.

Regardless of the source, problems need solutions. Perhaps it's just one person who has to put in the effort. Sometimes it's a collective effort of everyone on the planet that's required.

How you solve a problem is related to your values and beliefs. This means that who you are biases you toward a certain way of solving a problem. Your solution that requires negotiation and listening won't appeal to someone who thinks going in all-guns-blazing is the correct approach. Who's right? It's hard to know, but one certainty is there will be a debate over which approach is better.

For the big problems in society, we'll only know how good a solution is a decade or more after it's implemented. Even something the majority of people thought was good at the time has the potential to fail dramatically. Sometimes it will be because the solution itself was flawed. Other times it will be how the solution was implemented. Teasing apart why a solution isn't working is often so complicated that many are tempted to scrap it and try something different. If you've followed an election, you'll know what this looks like. Most political parties are quick to point out why something their opponents did was useless. The challenge for them is to come up with something better.

That's the challenge for all of us, really. How do we come up with something better than the status quo? On any given day, we have an opportunity to do better within our selves, our families, our workplaces, our communities, our country, and in the world. How do we do this?

I suggest we take more time to listen, on all levels. Start by listening to yourself. Tune into your emotions, gut feelings, hopes, fears and dreams. What can you do to be a better person?

Remember, the solutions you choose for problems are connected to your values and beliefs. Making change in the world means making changes in your self. You won't create a better outcome for yourself by making the same choices.

This approach scales. Remember that when you're in a position of leadership. Creating better outcomes for everyone starts with listening, empathizing, having compassion, collaborating, choosing a solution and then clearly communicating the reasons for that choice. Keep stakeholders informed as you go. Honestly evaluate progress. Be flexible and humble enough to admit mistakes if there were any, then get re-focused on the task at hand.

Remember: when you're confronted by a problem that if it was easy to fix, it would already be fixed. "Silver-bullet" type solutions are rare, largely because most situations are more complicated than being attacked by a werewolf. If there's any "magic" in solutions, it's doing your best to make the most appropriate decision, implementing, measuring, adjusting if necessary and continuing on. 

 




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